Putting the fizz into sustainable packaging

Coca-Cola Amatil has claimed to have produced Australia’s first carbonated soft drink bottles made from 100 per cent recycled plastic.

Group Managing Director Alison Watkins says while 100 per cent recycled plastic had previously been used in still beverages, it had never successfully been used for carbonated drinks.

All of Coca-Cola Amatil’s single-serve plastic bottles in Australia will now switch to the new fully recycled materials by the end of 2019.

Previously, Coca-Cola Australia and Coca-Cola Amatil announced that seven out of 10 of its plastic bottles would be made from recycled plastic by 2020. This is expected to reduce Amatil’s use of virgin plastic by around 10,000 tonnes a year.

Overcoming challenges 

“This switch to 100 per cent recycled materials for carbonated beverages is an Australian first, and a real credit to our technical team,” Ms Watkins said.

“We think every beverage container should be recycled and live again, not become waste in our marine and land environment.

“But pressure inside a soft drink bottle is up to 100 psi, or three times the pressure in a car tyre. So, the bottle for carbonated drinks needs to be much stronger than for still beverages, and that’s been an obstacle in using 100 per cent recycled materials for these types of drinks.

“I’m pleased to say we’ve overcome this challenge through innovation and design, and we’re now the first in Australia to make 100 per cent recycled plastic bottles for carbonated beverages.

“That’s great news for the sustainability of our products, and a credit to Australian innovation.”

Further initiatives 

Amatil has also ceased distribution of plastic straws and partnered with Keep Australia Beautiful to target litter hotspots nationwide.

The new 100 per cent recycled plastic bottle range supports The Coca-Cola Company’s aspiration for a ‘World Without Waste’ – an ambition to help collect and recycle one bottle or can for each one it produces.

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